Horse Racing Gambling

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Horse Racing Gambling

Horse Racing is among the most widely attended U.S. spectator sports. It is also a major professional sport in Canada, Great Britain, Ireland, Western Europe, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, and South America. The most popular form of the sport is the racing of mounted thoroughbred horses over flat courses at distances from three-quarters of a mile to two miles.

In the US, horse racing wagers, are referred to as Pari-Mutuel, meaning "to wager amongst ourselves" in French. American horse racing fans bet against and amongst one another, not against the horse racing track. Horse racing wagers, of a particular type, are placed together in a pool; taxes and a house take are removed, and payoff odds are calculated by sharing the pool among all placed bets.

In England, horse racing wagers are like sport wagers which have fixed odds. For example, the odds of horse#1 finishing first is at 4/1 (read "four-to-one" or "four-to-one against"). If horse#1 crosses the finish line first, the bettor makes a 400 profit on a 100 wager.

Pari-Mutuel betting differs from fixed odds betting in that the final payout is not determined until betting into the pool is closed. In fixed odds betting, the payout is agreed at the time the bet is placed.

The challenge of horse racing gambling is to collect and analyze information and then make a sound judgment on which horse to bet on, what type of bet to place and how much to bet.

There is obviously no guaranteed way of finding winners, but for a newcomer to horse racing, the task must seem quite intimidating. Several horses may all seem the same to the novice but there are many factors to take into consideration before risking any hard earned money.

Over the years, there have been all sorts of so called fail-proof winning statistical systems but the only way one can realistically hope to show a profit in dog racing is to study each and every dog race card in any given race.

Horse Racing's beginnings can be traced back to the 12th century, when English knights returned home from the Crusades with Arab horses. Over the next 400 years, breeding between imported Arab stallions and English mares produced horses that combined speed and endurance.

Horse Racing became a professional sport as early as 1702 to 1714. Race courses sprang up all over England and offered large purses to attract the best horses. The British settlers brought horses and horse racing to America, with the first American race track built in Long Island in 1665. The development of organized racing did not arrive to America until after the Civil War. In 1894, the American Jockey Club was formed to govern the sport.

The introduction of pari-mutuel betting for the Kentucky Derby signaled a renaissance for the sport after stumbling badly in the early 1900s. At the end of World War I, prosperity brought spectators flocking to race tracks. The sport prospered until World War II, declined in popularity during the 1950s and 1960s, enjoyed a resurgence in the 1970s and declined in the late 1980s. It is currently enjoying another renaissance, thanks to the popularity of horses like War Emblem, Funny Cide, and the legendary Seabiscuit.

Today, thoroughbred tracks exist in about half the states in the United States. Public interest in the sport focuses primarily on major thoroughbred races such as the Triple Crown (Kentucky Derby, Preakness, Belmont Stakes) and the Breeders' Cup.